Mar 23

New Resource from National Geographic

Some of your patrons may be interested in this site from National Geographic where they can access and print topographical maps.  You can find it at http://www.natgeomaps.com/trail-maps/pdf-quads

Mar 17

LitFestKC

The Rabbit Hole, Kansas City Public Library, and Crossroads Academy are hosting their 1st annual
Children’s Literature Festival!

Friday, April 28th and Saturday, April 29th, the Children’s Literature Festival is made up of author presentations, book signings, and more! Authors attending include: Brian Selznick, Nina Crews, Shane Evans, Sophie Blackall, John Marciano, Javaka Steptoe, and Jon Scieszka.

If you’re interested in attending, find more details at LITFESTKC.

Mar 02

Tax-lid Exemption For Libraries

Roger Carswell, the Director of the Southeast Kansas Libraries System reports:

Several of the regional library system directors were able to meet with Roger Basinger of the state Municipal Services office regarding the “library exemption” from the tax lid.  The news was probably the best we could have hoped for.

Although Mr. Basinger had been skeptical last year that the wording in the bill really was an exemption for libraries, he said after thinking about it through the winter, they have come to the conclusion that it is, in fact, an exemption for libraries.

Furthermore, the budget forms that cities, counties, etc. will use have the library exemption built in.  To oversimplify it a bit, on the page used to compute their maximum levy for 2018 without having to go to an election, they will start with the amount levied for 2017, then subtract off the amount levied for the library to come up with a base for computing the limit.  After allowing for factors they can increase for (such as new improvements) and applying the allowable increase (1.4% for cities, 1.3% for other units of local government) to come up with the maximum levy, they will then add the amount to be levied for the library in 2018 onto that.  Perfect!  No city should be able to claim that the library cannot have an increase because of the tax lid; that just won’t work with the forms.

Feb 16

Ever Heard of the Pilcrow Foundation?

The Pilcrow Foundation: Sharing Books with Rural Public Libraries

The Pilcrow Foundation’s mission is to provide new, quality, hardcover children’s books to rural public libraries across the United States.

We recognize that public libraries are often the center of their rural community, where people come together to learn and share ideas. Providing quality children’s books to rural public libraries ensures an opportunity for active engagement within the community and lifelong learning.

The Pilcrow Foundation supports rural public library communities through our Children’s Book Project. We ask libraries, in partnership with the Friends of the Library or other local sponsors, to raise one third of the funds used to purchase the new books which become part of the library’s permanent children’s book collection, thus ensuring children’s access to quality books for years to come.

For more information about the Pilcrow Foundation, visit their website The Pilcrow Foundation. Grant specific information can be found here.

Feb 08

World Read Aloud Day

World Read Aloud Day is February 16th!

World Read Aloud Day motivates children, teens, and adults worldwide to celebrate the power of words and creates a community of readers taking action to show the world that the right to literacy belongs to all people. World Read Aloud Day is celebrated by millions of people in more than 100 countries.

If your library wants to participate in World Read Aloud Day, visit LitWorld’s website and find out more. The site has free downloadable materials, like a banner and activity packs, as well as a link to register your event.

Jan 27

Library of Congress: Young Readers Center

The Library of Congress is opening a Young Readers Center!

January 28th is the grand opening of the new Young Readers Center at the library of congress. The event will feature a ribbon cutting with Dr. Carla Hayden and the Teen Board representatives, story time with award-winning authors, crafts, book accessibility demonstrations, and a special guest parade.

The Young Readers Center will host a weekly storytime every Friday, as well as a monthly teen reading meeting.

To find out more, visit the Young Readers Center website or take a look at their Grand Opening Flyer.

Jan 23

ALA Youth Media Awards

The Youth Media Awards have been announced!

For a full listing of the medalists and honor winners, visit the American Library Association listing. To learn more about specific awards, visit ALA’s Youth Media Awards page.

Jan 18

Capitol Journal article on the State Library of Kansas


Jo Budler’s calm, hospitable workplace is one of the most unusual and architecturally pleasing public libraries in Kansas.

On the third floor of the Capitol in Topeka, beyond the hustle and bustle of politicians, a set of double doors open to a two-story collection of reference materials that include a law book published more than 275 years ago. The State Library led by Budler spreads gospel of literacy far beyond the Statehouse by offering the state’s readers access to a massive online ebook service.

Read more here.

 

Jan 11

Readers’ Advisory to Children

Tool for Readers’ Advisory to Children

Providing readers’ advisory to children and parents can be both difficult and intimidating. If you want a little help, check out this great site created by the Mobile Public Library: Choosing Books for Kids.

It contains information about each age range’s reading needs and short descriptions of types of books a given age range typically enjoys, as well as suggestions of authors to try. This is a great training tool for staff and volunteers. Also, the site is easy to use and could be shared with parents. However, be sure to let them know that if they search an author, it is looking at the Mobile Public Library catalog, not your library’s catalog!

Dec 21

Flipped Learning

Ever heard of Flipped Learning? It has been around about ten years but the benefit of this learning model is the ability to demonstration real world applications and engage students with interactive projects.

It is called ‘flipped’ because the traditional definition was, “what used to be classwork” (the lecture) is done outside of class (usually with videos), and “what used to be homework” (assigned problems) is now done in class.

However, flipped learning has evolved to describe any situation in which technology is issued to time-shift the delivery of content.  It is where active learning meets technology.

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